Category: Sarasota Mental Health Program

Our collective hearts sink every time we see a veteran dealing with a form of disability. It reminds us that no matter how involved and wrapped up we sometimes get in our own lives, there are those who are making sacrifices to ensure our freedom and domestic tranquility as people. Even more tragic are the wounds that we can’t see on the surface. The mental health of our veterans is a growing concern, as is the number of cases involving TBI. 

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For many years, there was a strong stigma attached to mental health. This was the case when it came to veterans returning from conflicts overseas. While the phenomenon was simply dismissed as “shell shock,” it was and is a very real issue that continues to afflict the veterans of today. According to a study conducted by the VA (Veteran’s Affairs) Suicide Prevention program, approximately 20 veterans take their lives each day. Civilian practitioners of health care often don’t inquire about military service, and as a result, it becomes difficult to treat and diagnose conditions such as PTSD and depression. 

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Sometimes the mental health of veterans is very fragile after facing difficult and traumatic combat situations overseas. It’s a critical focus for us because it’s a common stumbling block for many good men and women trying to lead normal lives.

Let’s examine a few ways to better understand the mental health of veterans.

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Where does the concept of group therapy fit into providing help and relief for veterans? While it’s certainly not the only approach to helping a lonely vet, it does play an important role. Community indeed heals, which is why SRQ Vets wants to highlight some of the reasons we like this so much.

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Two of the biggest tragedies that continue to occur in our time are the still-existing stigmatization of mental health and the lack of care and compassion for many returning veterans. For several years, mental health was considered as either weakness or justified inferiority to the masses. Care was limited and for some completely non-existent. Nowhere was this more apparent than in the lack of treatment for veterans returning home from a tour of duty. In the early 1900s, PTSD went largely undiagnosed and was simply referred to as “shell shock.” While times have changed, the lack of compassion is still a problem for many. 

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It goes without saying that veterans don’t get nearly enough respect. Often, our opinion about current theatres of operations and conflicts cloud our empathy and prevent us from extending a caring and supportive hand. Many veterans returning home are suffering from PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) and head injuries. Getting the proper treatment isn’t always possible, so it’s up to us to help in any way we can.

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